Frozen – How to Beat the Blank Page!

What do you do when you sit down in front of that blank piece of paper, blank screen, or partially complete manuscript and you have nothing, I mean NOTHING to say? Let’s face it, this is an experience we’ve all had as writers, especially fiction writers. Whether you’re just starting a story or smack in the middle of it, we’ve all frozen up.

shutterstock_63759181And after the freezing comes the fear:

  • Is this story wrong?
  • Will I ever have a good idea again?
  • Do I just suck as a writer?

After years of writing, I’ve found the source of my deep freeze usually stems from two areas:

1. Am I missing something I need to know about my world?

  • This applies both to realistic and fantastic fiction, though your approach to answering that question may differ. For example, in a recent, non-speculative fiction novel, I had to write a scene about a man who was having a heart attack. The story was set in modern day, but characters had neither a working cell phone nor a landline telephone. I had a number of characters on the scene, one who was trained in CPR. My story got stuck rather quickly because I needed some basic information: (a) how long could a person be under CPR before being reasonably revived (b) how long a person could perform CPR without succumbing to exhaustion (c) how far the runner would need to go in order to find someone with a working cell-phone? A bit of research into the terrain and the intricacies of CPR and I was good to go!
  • The same thing can apply more deeply. For example, is your magical system unclear? What do people eat in your world, what are the obligations of a host to a guest, how long does it take to travel from village A to B and etc. Sometimes the answer is just learning more about your world, whatever it is. The danger of this, of course, is spending the next two weeks playing the research game. So how do you escape this trap? For me, I always ask myself, what is the minimum I need to know to write the scene? Get specific. For example, I need to know what the obligation of a host is to a particular guest, but only insofar as it’s relevant to the scene at hand. I can fill in the rest later, should it become relevant. The more important a detail is to your story, the more you need to fill it in, but if it’s a minor thing, don’t spend more than a ten or fifteen minutes looking/making it up.

So how do get yourself unfrozen when faced with a world building problem? Here is my favorite site for developing my world: Patricia Wrede’s Fantasy Worldbuilding Questions. It is VERY detailed, and I don’t start with doing everything here, but I try to touch on the high points as I like to have a fair amount of worldbuilding done before I start writing. I also find that these questions apply just as well to science fiction as to fantasy worlds.

LINK: http://www.sfwa.org/2009/08/fantasy-worldbuilding-questions/

2. Am I missing something I need to know about a character in the scene?

  • Main character: Is there something important that I don’t “know” about my main character that I need to know in order to start this story/write this scene? Do I know enough about this person’s past in order to understand her present? Do I have a good feel for her voice?
  • Supporting Characters: Is there something I need to know about non-main character in the scene? I especially love to ask this of minor characters. What’s the butler’s story? How about that kid in the corner shining shoes? The fool? The family dog? The most important question for me about minor characters is “what do they want?” Either that or, “what is their secret”. Both of these are fun. Even something as simple as the man serving wine wants to get back to the kitchen and see his  boyfriend gives me some idea of how he’s acting in the scene. His boyfriend is the main character’s brother makes things even more fun.

So how do you learn more about your characters? For me, the best method for finding out what I’m missing is to do a character journal. If it’s a main character, I’ve generally done a character journal either before I start the book or at least somewhere in Chapter 1. But for minor characters, I may not know anything about them at all. So my first step is to look at each minor character and ask myself, “What are you doing in this scene? Why are you here?” and most importantly, “What do you want?” or “what is your secret?” Usually my instincts for this are pretty good, and it only takes 1-2 characters for me to find out who the important (seemingly unimportant) person in the scene is. Once I know who this person is, what they want, and what they’re hiding, the scene usually gets unstuck rather quickly and it’s full speed ahead!

My favorite resource for character journaling is in Alice Orr’s book No More Rejections. I’ve used the character journaling techniques in this book for over a decade and they’ve work for me. What I like about her approach is that you answer the question in the first person and there are many questions like, “I think my best feature is ____” which allows you to really get into the psychology of how the character feels about herself as opposed to merely a physical list of traits. I’ve applied this approach to character lists I’ve found for free online, but hers is the best, in my opinion.

LINK: http://www.amazon.com/No-More-Rejections-Secrets-Manuscript/dp/1582972850/

So that’s my approach, first I check my world, and then I check my characters. What do you do to get unstuck? Feel free to post in the comments below.

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Let’s talk about GoT Baby – A Game of Thrones Link Grab Bag!

I’m not going to lie, I just got back home after almost two months of globetrotting and I’m as jetlagged as I can be, so we’re keeping this one short and incoherent.

Let’s talk about Game of Thrones!

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I’m one of the rare literary nerd types who hasn’t actually read the series in advance of the television show. This is because I made a deliberate decision when I was about 17 years old not to start a thousand page/book epic fantasy series until it was finished (for fear the author would lose interest or suddenly expire, leaving me on an endless cliffhanger…kind of harsh but there you are), and while I don’t always follow this rule, it has generally served me well. It’s also why I haven’t read Robert Jordan’s the Wheel of Time.

Since falling in love with the television show GoT though, I have started to read the books, taking care to read each book after the television series has covered what happened in it. (Hence, I’ll be reading book 3 after season 4). This is because nine times out of ten, you like the book more than the television series or movie, and the best way to enjoy both is to watch it first, then read. This is another personal rule that has served me well.

I am enjoying Game of Thrones: watching the show, playing catchup with the novels, looking at memes and catching up on all of the chatter about the show online. It’s with that background that I bring you some interesting perspectives from other well-rested bloggers that I have found online.There are spoilers through season 3 as well as for the books up to that point. You have been warned.

Ever ask yourself how female characters are handled in the GoT television series? Do you think Sansa Stark is wildly annoying or a tough girl in a bad situation? How about all of those whores? Here are some interesting links related to feminism and GoT:

In Defense of Sansa Stark: http://feministfiction.com/2012/05/10/in-defense-of-sansa-stark/ (and check out the rest of the articles about GoT on this site)

Just Because You Like it Doesn’t Make It Feminist: http://feministcurrent.com/7578/just-because-you-like-it-doesnt-make-it-feminist/

Do you get a bit squirmy when you see how POC are depicted (or not) in GoT? Some interesting articles on race and GoT.

Is Game of Thrones too White: http://www.salon.com/2012/04/01/is_game_of_thrones_too_white/

George R. R. Martin speaks on Race and GoT in Season 4: http://www.themarysue.com/grrm-thrones-race/

Game of Thrones HBO TV Show Has a Race Problem: http://www.policymic.com/articles/48275/game-of-thrones-tv-show-hbo-show-has-a-race-problem

Game of Thrones and the Disabled:

The Disabled Can Play Game of Thrones: http://www.fangsforthefantasy.com/2012/03/disabled-can-play-game-of-thrones.html

Pop Culture: Review of Tyrion Lannister: http://disabilitythinking.blogspot.com/2013/05/pop-culture-review-tyrion-lannister.html

And some humor:

Honest Trailer – Game of Thrones: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SVaD8rouJn0

So what do you think? Have any other links to share? Feel free to post your thoughts in the comments below.

Some Words about Witches

The wind howled. Lightning stabbed at the earth erratically, like an inefficient assassin…
 …In the middle of this elemental storm a fire gleamed among the dripping furze bushes, like the madness in a weasel’s eye. It illuminated three hunched figures. As the cauldron bubbled an eldritch voice shrieked: “When shall we three meet again?”
            There was a pause.
            Finally another voice said, in far more ordinary tones: “Well, I can do next Tuesday.”
 
–Terry Pratchett, Wyrd Sisters
 
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As Halloween approaches, the witch decorations are out again. The green-skinned hag, the pointy hats, the buckled shoes, and the broomsticks…oh my, the broomsticks. Anyone who’s done any reading at all on the true history of witches knows that those tropes are stereotypes (of the times as much as of the women labeled as witches). Happily, the term “witch” is losing some of that stigma as more writers create well-rounded characters and offer different interpretations of what these women (and yes, men) did all day.
 
So what about witches? Ok, here’s the deal. This post is really just an advert for someone else’s posts. The fantastic author Katherine Langrish has recently put together a great, thoughtful series of posts on witchy things: witches in children’s literature, good vs. bad witches, and the role of feminism in the evolving idea of the witch. They are all fine reading, and we suggest you check them out as the nights darken!*  
 
 
 
 
 
 
*Sorry, southern hemi friends! No dark nights for you right now. We’ll make you a spooky post in six months!